Symptomatic uterine fibroids cause substantial morbidity

November 5, 2013
Symptomatic uterine fibroids cause substantial morbidity

(HealthDay)—Symptomatic uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) have a substantial impact on quality of life, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Bijan J. Borah, Ph.D., of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues conducted a national survey of a racially diverse sample of 968 women, aged 29 to 59 years, with self-reported symptomatic uterine leiomyomas, to assess the impact of this condition on quality of life.

The researchers found that women waited an average of 3.6 years before seeking treatment for uterine . About a third (28 percent) of women reported missing work because of symptoms. Most women (79 percent) did not want invasive surgery for fibroids, and a majority (51 percent) wanted to preserve the uterus. Among women younger than 40 years, 43 percent wanted to preserve fertility.

"Many people are unaware that the vast majority of women will experience in their lifetime," a coauthor said in a statement. "This condition can cause significant morbidity for those who are symptomatic."

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

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