BMI not linked to pain after exercise rehab for back pain

BMI not linked to pain after exercise rehab for back pain

(HealthDay)—For individuals with chronic low back pain (cLBP), body mass index (BMI) is not significantly associated with self-reported pain and disability, according to a study published in the Dec. 1 issue of Spine.

Cristy Brooks, from the University of Western Sydney, and colleagues retrospectively analyzed changes in self-reported pain and disability among 128 males and females with cLBP who performed eight weeks of exercise, consisting of three to five exercise sessions (minimum of one supervised session) per week.

The researchers found that there were no baseline relationships between BMI and self-reported pain and disability (P = 0.349 and 0.314, respectively). No association was seen for exercise-related changes in pain and disability with BMI at baseline (P = 0.938 and 0.873, respectively) or with changes in BMI (P = 0.402 and 0.854, respectively). Furthermore, exercise-based pain and disability changes were not predicted by BMI.

"The reliance on BMI as a sole measurement of obesity in cLBP research may be unwarranted," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
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