British surgeon suspended for 'branding initials on liver'

A British surgeon has been suspended over allegations that he "branded" his initials onto a patient's liver, media reported on Tuesday.

Simon Bramhall faces an investigation after a colleague discovered the initials "SB" on the organ during a follow-up operation at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, central England, newspapers said.

The hospital's managing trust said in a statement: "Following an allegation of misconduct, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust has suspended a surgeon while an internal investigation is completed."

The Daily Mail newspaper said Bramhall used non-toxic argon gas to sear his initials onto the .

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rkolter
Dec 24, 2013
I could see someone doing this.

It's just like when people sign the insides of car doors or the opposite side of plasterboard in a building or spray grafitti in unused subway tunnels that rarely if ever get viewed again. Some people get a thrill out of hiding messages. In this case, inside someone.

I am not arguing that it's the right thing to do or a good thing; just that the mindset isn't all that uncommon and it's no surprise it is found in some doctors too.

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