Hemophilia and long-term HIV infection—is there a protective link?

©2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

People with the genetic blood clotting disorder hemophilia who have been infected with HIV for decades have an increased proportion of immune cells in their blood that specifically target HIV. This protective immune response helps chronically infected hemophilia patients survive, even during periods of HIV activity, according to a study published in BioResearch Open Access.

Volker Daniel and colleagues, University of Heidelberg and Kurpfalz Hospital, Germany, compared the levels of a class of HIV-reactive called CD8+ lymphocytes in the blood of hemophilia patients infected with HIV for 30 years and in health individuals. They present the results in "HIV-Specific CD8+ T Lymphocytes in Blood of Long-Term HIV-Infected Hemophilia Patients."

"Understanding the reasons for long-term clinical stability in hemophilia patients living with HIV remains an important research goal, with high clinical significance," says BioResearch Open Access Editor Jane Taylor, PhD, MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Scotland. "Using a unique cohort of patients, who have been living with HIV-1 for more than 30 years, the authors propose that it is the cellular anti-HIV-1 response in combination with anti-retroviral therapy that ensures the long-term survival of these patients."

More information: The article is available free on the BioResearch Open Access website.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New research shows promise for possible HIV cure

Dec 03, 2013

Researchers have used radioimmunotherapy (RIT) to destroy remaining human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected cells in the blood samples of patients treated with antiretroviral therapy, offering the promise ...

Recommended for you

Cambodia orders probe into mass HIV infection

Dec 18, 2014

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen on Thursday ordered a probe into an apparent mass HIV infection believed to have been spread by contaminated needles, as the number of suspected cases passed 100.

A fresh setback for efforts to cure HIV infection

Dec 17, 2014

Researchers are reporting another disappointment for efforts to cure infection with the AIDS virus. Six patients given blood-cell transplants similar to one that cured a man known as "the Berlin patient" have ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.