One in six men and women feel that their health affects their sex life

A new study, published in The Lancet as part of the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal), systematically assesses the association between individuals' general health and their sex lives, finding that close to one in six (17%) of men and women in Britain say that their health affects their sex life. This proportion rises to three fifths (60%) among men and women who say they are in bad health.

The new findings show the extent to which ill-health is linked to whether people have sex, as well as satisfaction with their sex lives. Additionally, the research shows that only a quarter of men (24%) and under a fifth of women (18%) who say that ill-health affected their in the past year sought help from a health professional, usually a GP. The authors of the study suggest that should consider giving greater attention to providing appropriate advice on patients' sex lives as part of their wider health.

According to study lead author Dr Nigel Field, of University College London (UCL): "Our findings indicate that many patients with chronic ill-health are well aware of an effect of their health on their sex lives, but most (over three quarters) do not seek help from health professionals. This suggests a need to raise awareness, improve guidance, and build communication skills among health professionals in talking to patients who may be concerned about how their health affects their sex life."

The researchers, from UCL (University College London), the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and NatCen Social Research, found that the proportion of people who had recently had sex (within the past four weeks) declined with age, and that sexual activity was also lower among those who reported being in bad health than among those who reported being in very good health. This association with health remained even after the results were adjusted to account for age and whether respondents were in a relationship.

The researchers also analysed the associations between sexual satisfaction, age and health. Overall, around three fifths (60%) of men and women reported being satisfied with their sex lives, though this proportion was lower in older people. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with poorer health, with the association again remaining after adjustment for age and relationship status.

However, although the overall results show a clear association between ill-health and individuals' sex lives, the researchers point out that many people who are in bad health report being sexually active and/or satisfied with their sex life. Around a third of respondents who were in bad reported recent sexual activity, and just under half of the same group reported being satisfied with their sex life.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The British Sexual Health Survey comes of age

Nov 25, 2013

Over 15,000 adults aged 16-74 participated in interviews between September 2010 and August 2012. Studying this large representative sample of people living in Britain allowed the researchers to produce key estimates on patterns ...

Brits having less sex—but more variety

Nov 25, 2013

When it comes to the bedroom, the British may be getting less busy, but more creative. According to results from the latest national sex survey, Britons are having sex less often—but the kinds of sex they're having are ...

Britain: One in six pregnancies are unplanned

Nov 26, 2013

One in six pregnancies among women in Britain are unplanned, and one in 60 women (1.5%) experience an unplanned pregnancy in a year, according to new results from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles ...

STIs and risky sex still an issue

Nov 26, 2013

New results from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal), published in The Lancet, provide a picture of sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence and testing, uptake of sexual health interv ...

Recommended for you

Hospital logs staggering 2.5 million alarms in just a month

4 hours ago

Following the study of a hospital that logged more than 2.5 million patient monitoring alarms in just one month, researchers at UC San Francisco have, for the first time, comprehensively defined the detailed causes as well ...

User comments