Nonantibiotic prophylaxis can benefit recurrent UTI

December 3, 2013
Nonantibiotic prophylaxis can benefit recurrent UTI

(HealthDay)—Various nonantibiotic prophylaxis options are available, some of which may be beneficial for adults with recurrent urinary tract infections, according to a review and meta-analysis published in the December issue of The Journal of Urology.

Mariëlle A.J. Beerepoot, M.D., from the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, and colleagues reviewed the literature to assess the effectiveness, tolerability, and safety of nonantibiotic in adults with . Data were included from 17 studies for 2,165 patients.

The researchers found that the rate of recurrence was decreased with use of the oral immunostimulant OM-89 (four trials; risk ratio, 0.61), with a good safety profile. The recurrence of infections was slightly reduced with the vaginal vaccine Urovac (three trials; relative risk, 0.81), and the time to reinfection was increased with primary immunization followed by booster immunization. There was a trend toward preventing urinary tract infections with vaginal estrogens (two trials; relative risk, 0.42; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.16 to 1.10), but in 6 to 20 percent of women, vaginal irritation occurred. Recurrence was also decreased with cranberries (two trials; relative risk, 0.53) and acupuncture (two open-label trials; relative risk, 0.48). The rate of recurrence was not decreased with oral estrogens and lactobacilli prophylaxis.

"The evidence of the effectiveness of the oral immunostimulant OM-89 is promising," the authors write. "Large head-to-head trials should be performed to optimally inform clinical decision making."

Some of the studies included in the review were funded by manufacturers.

Explore further: Testosterone therapy doesn't worsen urinary symptoms

More information: Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Testosterone therapy doesn't worsen urinary symptoms

November 25, 2013

(HealthDay)—For hypogonadal men, testosterone replacement therapy is associated with a low risk of worsening lower urinary tract symptoms, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

Antibiotics prevent some hospital UTIs

June 21, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—Urinary tract infections are among the most common infections acquired in hospitals. Most are linked to catheters that drain urine from the bladder, providing a direct route for bacteria to enter.

Recommended for you

Researchers discover rare flu-thwarting mutation

September 29, 2016

A rare and improbable mutation in a protein encoded by an influenza virus renders the virus defenseless against the body's immune system. This University of Rochester Medical Center discovery could provide a new strategy ...

Utah man may have contracted Zika from dying father's tears

September 29, 2016

A Utah man who mysteriously contracted Zika from his infected father may have got it by touching his dad's tears or sweat with his bare hands, according to new research unveiled Wednesday that found the unusual transmission ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.