1,500 tested for TB at Southern California school

December 21, 2013

More than 1,500 staff and students at a Southern California high school have been tested for tuberculosis after one student was diagnosed with the bacterial infection last month.

Riverside County say nearly 1,400 students and faculty at Indio High School were tested on Friday and around 130 students had the TB tests on Monday.

Forty-five students have tested positive for possible exposure to the disease but more tests will be needed to determine whether they have active TB.

Students and staff will have to show proof of testing before they can return to school.

Health officials say they don't think the infections has spread to any other schools or surrounding neighborhoods.

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