Toxic employees are damaging to medical practices

Toxic employees are damaging to medical practices
Toxic behavior can harm medical practices and should not be tolerated, according to an article published Dec. 10 in Medical Economics.

(HealthDay)—Toxic behavior can harm medical practices and should not be tolerated, according to an article published Dec. 10 in Medical Economics.

Noting that toxic employees can sap the morale of staff and impact patients' perceptions, Judy Bee, a medical practice consultant from Practice Performance Group in La Jolla, Calif., discusses how to identify and manage toxic employees.

Bee notes that availability, attitude, and ability are the three components of employee performance, in that order of priority. Lack of availability can generate resentment and depress physician production, especially in a smaller practice. Good attitude, including cheerful demeanor, willingness to help, being courteous and cooperative, and being considerate of others will affect the practice. For toxic employees, conducting a performance review is important, allowing objective criteria and less serious behaviors to be discussed. Tolerating an employee's has a knock-on effect, with the remaining staff losing respect for the manager or physician in charge. If a toxic employee improves their behavior after performance review, it should be noticed and rewarded.

"If a toxic employee can't or won't make the changes you need them to, it's time for physicians and managers to make the decision to part ways with that employee, and to give that toxic worker an opportunity to find a job where showing up with a isn't a requirement," Bee writes.

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Sinister1812
not rated yet Dec 27, 2013
If the employees aren't enthusiastic or devoted to their work, why should the employers be forced to keep them?
katesisco
5 / 5 (1) Dec 28, 2013
Especially since there is no obligation to care for anyone's sustenance if they espouse different views.
May I point out here that on the internet there is a remarkable lack of reviews for public housing or more to the point rental housing for any kind and why is that? Because the people who rely on public housing would find themselves targeted for exclusion is why.
So much for equality and freedom of speech.