Anti-inflammatory drugs may improve treatment of abnormal maternal inflammation

January 9, 2014

New research out of Queen's University has shown that anti-inflammatory drugs could be beneficial in the treatment of abnormal maternal inflammation during pregnancy, a condition that can cause serious diseases like pre-eclampsia and can lead to small babies.

Professor Charles Graham (Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) worked on the project along with lead author Tiziana Cotechini (PhD student, Biomedical and Molecular Sciences) and co-authors Maria Komisarenko, Arissa Sperou, Shannyn Macdonald-Goodfellow and Michael A. Adams.

"Babies who are born too small are referred to as growth restricted," says Professor Graham. "These are at an increased risk of suffering from diabetes and heart disease in their adult lives. Many of these growth-restricted babies are born to women suffering from pre-eclampsia, a disease often associated with excessive maternal inflammation during pregnancy."

According to the research, there are currently no effective treatments to prevent or pre-eclampsia as doctors do not fully understand the factors that cause these diseases.

"We believe that excessive maternal inflammation during pregnancy restricts blood flow to the placenta which leads to and pre-eclampsia," says Professor Graham.

This new research shows that abnormal maternal inflammation may be an important factor that causes certain complications of pregnancy. The research group will continue investigating the role of in diseases of pregnancy and how anti-inflammatory drugs may be a beneficial treatment option.

Explore further: Fish oil found to help serious pregnancy complications

More information: The research was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and was published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine: jem.rupress.org/content/early/2013/12/30/jem.20130295.abstract

Related Stories

Fish oil found to help serious pregnancy complications

July 29, 2013

Taking fish oil during pregnancy could limit the effects of serious complications such as gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and miscarriage as well as enhancing fetal growth, according to researchers at The University of ...

Pre-eclampsia rates on the rise in the US

November 21, 2013

A latest study by researchers at the Mailman School of Public Health and Columbia University Medical Center reports that pre-eclampsia, characterized by an elevation in the blood pressure and excess protein in the urine of ...

Recommended for you

Scientists reveal cellular clockwork underlying inflammation

August 27, 2015

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have uncovered key cellular functions that help regulate inflammation—a discovery that could have important implications for the treatment of allergies, ...

New research finds ozone in smog may cause asthma

September 7, 2015

It's completely invisible, but the distinctive smell of electrical discharge after photocopying is a tell-tale sign of ozone in the air. Ozone is a component of what we refer to as 'smog' and on hot sunny days, in cities ...

Severe asthma fails to respond to mainstay treatment

June 29, 2015

The immune response that occurs in patients with severe asthma is markedly different than what occurs in milder forms of the lung condition, according to researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Those ...

New hope for patients with chronic wounds

June 29, 2015

Most wounds clear up by themselves, but some fail to heal and become chronic. An international team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet, now unveil the important role of so-called microRNAs in regulating skin wound ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.