Conserving blood cuts transfusions in aortic valve surgery

Conserving blood cuts transfusions in aortic valve surgery

(HealthDay)—A blood conservation strategy (BCS) reduces red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) without increasing mortality or morbidity, according to research published in the January issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

David W. Yaffee, M.D., of the New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues retrospectively reviewed the records of patients undergoing AVR before (391 patients) and after (387 patients) enactment of BCS at a single institution.

The researchers found that the incidence of RBC transfusion decreased significantly from 82.9 percent in the pre-BCS group to 68.0 percent in the post-BCS group. No difference was observed in the rates of mortality or major complications between the groups. Patients receiving isolated AVR and also were less likely to have transfusions. RBC transfusion of two or more units on the day of operation was significantly associated with increased mortality, prolonged intubation, postoperative renal failure, and increased incidence of any complication.

"The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists clinical practice guidelines for blood conservation in routine cardiac surgery should be extended to AVR patients," the authors write. "Decreased blood product utilization can be effected in AVR patients by limiting hemodilution, tolerating perioperative anemia, and educating the cardiac surgical care providers on blood management."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Blood transfusions in cardiac surgery may up infections

Jun 05, 2013

(HealthDay)—Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) during or after surgery may increase the risk of major infections, such as pneumonia and bloodstream infections, according to research published in the ...

Poorer outcomes after non-cardiac surgery in DM

Sep 11, 2013

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, diabetes is associated with adverse perioperative complications and mortality, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in Diabetes Care.

Recommended for you

ASHG: MI without substantial CAD is minimally heritable

2 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The presence of myocardial infarction (MI) without substantial coronary artery disease (CAD) is not familial, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of ...

New treatment for inherited cholesterol

8 hours ago

At the London Olympics in 2012, South African swimmer Cameron van den Burgh dedicated his world record-breaking win in the 100m breast stroke to one of his biggest rivals and closest friends, Alexander Dale ...

Alternate approach to traditional CPR saves lives

15 hours ago

A new study shows that survival and neurological outcomes for patients in cardiac arrest can be improved by adding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) when performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The study ...

User comments