FDA: Aleve may be safer on heart than rival drugs

Federal health experts say the pain reliever found in Aleve may be safer on the heart than other popular anti-inflammatory drugs taken by millions of Americans.

A Food and Drug Administration review posted online states that naproxen, the key ingredient in Aleve and other generic pain pills, may have a lower risk of heart attack and stroke than rival medications like ibuprofen, sold as Advil and Motrin. FDA staffers recommend relabeling naproxen to emphasize its safety.

The agency will ask a panel of experts next month to discuss the latest evidence on the and whether should be relabeled. The agency is not required to follow the group's advice.

If finalized, the labeling changes could reshape the market for drugs used to treat headaches, and arthritis.

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