H1N1 flu deaths hit 123 in Mexico, officials say

Constanza Fuentes gets a voluntary flu vaccination from nurse Carla Flores at a subway station in Mexico City, Monday Jan. 27, 2014. Mexican health authorities are worried about a spike in the number of H1N1 flu cases and deaths, in the country that was the epicenter of the 2009 outbreak of the strain. The Health Department says the figures remain well below 2009 levels. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

Mexico is worried about a spike in the number of H1N1 flu cases and deaths, in the country that was the epicenter of the 2009 outbreak of the strain.

But even with 1,261 confirmed cases of the and 123 deaths in the Jan. 1-23 period, the Health Department says the figures remain well below 2009 levels, when there were 1,479 deaths and more than 70,000 confirmed cases for the year as a whole.

The H1N1 strain generally hits people in the prime of their life, and memories remain sharp of the 2009 outbreak. People have waited in long lines at vaccination posts set up in Mexico City's subway stations to get their flu shots.

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