Imaging the brain's energy usage

Imaging the brain’s energy usage
A new way to map the brain offers promise for disease diagnosis methods that would reduce patient exposure to radioactivity. Credit: wenht/iStock/Thinkstock

A team of researchers led by Kai-Hsiang Chuang of the A*STAR Singapore Bioimaging Consortium has developed a new imaging technique to measure the rate at which the brain consumes glucose, without using radioactively labeled 'tracer' molecules.

Brain cells use glucose as an energy source. Therefore, the rate at which they take up sugar from the bloodstream and break it down into its metabolites is an important indicator of cellular function and . Glucose uptake and metabolism are typically measured using a surrogate molecule called 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), containing radioactive carbon or fluorine. When injected, this molecule is taken up by and converted into 2DG-6-phosphate (2DG6P). Positron emission tomography (PET) or autoradiography is then used to detect the radioactivity levels throughout the brain, which provides a measure of glucose usage.

The technique developed by Chuang and co-workers is sensitive enough to detect levels of 2DG and 2DG6P without first having to label them with radioactive isotopes. It relies on a relatively new imaging method called chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) to amplify the magnetic signal produced when 2DG and 2DG6P exchange protons with water molecules.

The researchers tested the new technique, called glucoCEST, on live animals for the first time. They injected 2DG into rats and used (NMR) to detect the CEST signal. They found that the signal changes with the concentration of 2DG and 2DG6P, and that it is reduced by the general anesthetic isoflurane, which suppresses brain activity. Their results also showed that the CEST signal is not affected by acidity levels of the blood and brain or related to changes in blood flow around the brain.

Imaging of metabolism is widely used to aid diagnosis and evaluation of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's. Current methods involve radioactivity so they cannot be frequently used on the same patient and are typically not used on pregnant women and children. The glucoCEST method overcomes this problem, offering a new approach to the diagnosis and prognosis of such diseases.

"This method can achieve higher resolution than PET and is far more sensitive than other NMR techniques," says Chuang. "Imaging at higher magnetic fields would improve a limiting factor of the method: lower sensitivity of detection than radioactive tracers." Employing higher magnetic fields to improve the detection sensitivity would enable the use of lower doses of 2DG.

"We are now designing experiments to evaluate the feasibility of the method in humans," Chuang adds.

More information: Nasrallah, F. A., Pagès, G., Kuchel, P. W., Golay, X. & Chuang, K.-H., "Imaging brain deoxyglucose uptake and metabolism by glucoCEST MRI." Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism 33, 1270–1278 (2013). dx.doi.org/10.1038/jcbfm.2013.79

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Sugar makes cancer light-up in MRI scanners

Jul 07, 2013

A new technique for detecting cancer by imaging the consumption of sugar with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been unveiled by UCL scientists. The breakthrough could provide a safer and simpler alternative ...

Feed a cold -- starve a tumor

Oct 21, 2011

The condition tuberous sclerosis, due to mutation in one of two tumor suppressor genes, TSC1 or TSC2, causes the growth of non-malignant tumors throughout the body and skin. These tumors can be unsightly and cause serious ...

Recommended for you

New ALS associated gene identified using innovative strategy

4 hours ago

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, ...

Can bariatric surgery lead to severe headache?

4 hours ago

Bariatric surgery may be a risk factor for a condition that causes severe headaches, according to a study published in the October 22, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurol ...

Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level

4 hours ago

A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.

Brain simulation raises questions

8 hours ago

What does it mean to simulate the human brain? Why is it important to do so? And is it even possible to simulate the brain separately from the body it exists in? These questions are discussed in a new paper ...

Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells

8 hours ago

Scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington's disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Unlike other techniques ...

User comments