Medical staff performance goals should be clear, attainable

Medical staff performance goals should be clear, attainable

(HealthDay)—Staff performance in medical practices needs to be appropriately managed and measured with performance goals, according to an article published Dec. 25 in Medical Economics.

Keith Borglum, C.H.B.C., a practice management consultant from Professional Management and Marketing in Santa Rosa, Calif., offers some tips for reviewing employees' performances and determining when raises are appropriate.

Borglum says that, first, setting clearly defined goals is necessary for managers and staff. He says that goals should be "challenging yet attainable, clear and unambiguous, written and measurable." Additionally, the draft goals should be discussed at a staff meeting. After agreement of the goals, staff achievement and compliance needs to be managed. This should involve some form of checklist and grading of . Lastly, performance needs to be rewarded both through raises, when appropriate, and public praise. Reprimanding staff should always be done privately.

"Having employees is like having diabetes. There is no cure, only management," Borglum writes, quoting one of his favorite human resources sayings.

More information: Full Article

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

The hunt for botanicals

6 hours ago

Herbal medicine can be a double-edged sword and should be more rigorously investigated for both its beneficial and harmful effects, say researchers writing in a special supplement of Science.

Mozambique decriminalises abortion to stem maternal deaths

7 hours ago

Mozambique has passed a law permitting women to terminate unwanted pregnancies under specified conditions without risking punishment, a move hailed by activists in a country where clandestine abortions account for a large ...

Infertility, surrogacy in India

8 hours ago

Infertility is a growing problem worldwide. A World Health Organization report estimates that 60-to-80 million couples worldwide currently suffer from infertility.

Tooth loss linked to slowing mind and body

20 hours ago

The memory and walking speeds of adults who have lost all of their teeth decline more rapidly than in those who still have some of their own teeth, finds new UCL research.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.