Sleep-disordered breathing may worsen pregnancy outcomes

Sleep-disordered breathing may worsen pregnancy outcomes
Evidence from published observational studies suggests that maternal sleep-disordered breathing is associated with increased risk of gestational hypertension and gestational diabetes, according to research published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

(HealthDay)—Evidence from published observational studies suggests that maternal sleep-disordered breathing is associated with increased risk of gestational hypertension and gestational diabetes, according to research published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Sushmita Pamidi, M.D., of McGill University in Montreal, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of selected studies to assess the association between sleep-disordered and risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including gestational hypertension/preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and low-birth-weight infants.

The researchers found 31 studies that met the defined criteria; 21 studies, all observational, reported dichotomous outcomes, and nine of these studies adjusted for potential confounding variables. Maternal sleep-disordered breathing was significantly associated with of gestational hypertension/preeclampsia (pooled adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.34; five studies) and gestational diabetes (pooled aOR, 1.86; five studies).

"Based on published observational studies to date, maternal sleep-disordered breathing is associated with an increased risk of gestational hypertension and after adjusting for potential confounders," the authors write. "However, large-scale, prospective cohort, and interventional studies are needed to further elucidate the relationship between maternal sleep-disordered breathing and adverse pregnancy outcomes."

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Report highlights progress, challenges in health IT

16 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Progress has been made toward widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), although there are still barriers to adoption of advanced use of EHRs, according to a report published ...

Training your brain to prefer healthy foods

16 hours ago

It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research by scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center ...

Outdoor enthusiasts need a lightning plan

16 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Those partaking in outdoor sports and activities need to be aware of the threat posed by lightning and take appropriate safety measures, experts say.

User comments