Two out of three adults in England overweight or obese

More than 60 percent of adults in England are overweight or obese, according to new figures by the national public health agency.

The figures were released Tuesday. Experts have previously predicted England's increasing could mean half its population will be obese by 2030. People who are heavy have a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers.

To fight bulging waistlines in Stoke-on-Trent in the West Midlands, authorities are trying a new approach. Overweight people can sign up to get frequent text messages encouraging them to move more and eat less.

One text says "Maybe walk to the shops or use the stairs more often." Officials described it as a "cheap and effective nudge" to take action before need expensive medical attention.

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