Research agenda developed for teen antipsychotic rx use

Research agenda developed for teen antipsychotic rx use
Prioritized research agendas have been developed for antipsychotic use among adolescents and young adults and for the management of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to two reports published online Feb. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay)—Prioritized research agendas have been developed for antipsychotic use among adolescents and young adults and for the management of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to two reports published online Feb. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Matthew J. Crowley, M.D., from the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center in North Carolina, and colleagues describe the development of a prioritized research agenda relating to use among adolescents and with bipolar disorder. The existing literature was reviewed and a list of 23 potential evidence gaps identified. The stakeholders prioritized 10 high-priority evidence gaps, which related to three areas: comparative effectiveness of intervention strategies; the impact of medications of patient-centered outcomes; and the effect of patient characteristics on the effectiveness of antipsychotic medications.

In a second report, Jennifer M. Gierisch, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C., and colleagues describe the development of a prioritized research agenda relating to the different surveillance and management options for women with DCIS. The existing literature was reviewed to identify evidence gaps, and stakeholders ranked these using a forced-ranking prioritization method. The researchers identified the 10 highest-ranked evidence gaps, which related to incorporation of patient-centered outcomes into future research; improvement of risk prediction for ; evaluation of active surveillance as a strategy; and assessment of decision-making tools.

"Improvement of the ability of women given a DCIS diagnosis to make informed decisions about management options will be a critical need for the foreseeable future," Gierisch and colleagues write.

More information: Full Text - Crowley (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text - Gierisch (subscription or payment may be required)

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