Study shows association between diabetes and stroke in women but not men

February 24, 2014

New research published in Diabetologia shows that diabetes in women is associated with an increased risk of stroke, whereas the data do not show the same association among men. The research is by Dr Wenhui Zhao (the first author), Dr Gang Hu and colleagues at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA.

Differences in incidence and mortality between sexes have been reported for various conditions, including stroke. More women than men tend to die from stroke in developed countries. For example, in the USA, 77,109 women and 52,367 men died from stroke in 2010. Women accounted for almost 60% of US stroke deaths in 2010. In the UK, 32,828 women and 20,358 men died from stroke in 2007.

The authors prospectively investigated the sex-specific association of different levels of HbA1c with incident among 10,876 male and 19,278 female patients with type 2 diabetes in the Louisiana State University Hospital-Based Longitudinal Study (LSUHLS). During a mean follow up of 6.7 years, 2,949 incident cases of stroke were identified. The authors calculated the risk of associated with different levels of HbA1c at baseline (<6.0%, 6.0

Explore further: Raised risk of ischemic stroke in women with A-fib explored

More information: Diabetologia DOI: 10.1007/s00125-014-3190-3

Related Stories

Raised risk of ischemic stroke in women with A-fib explored

December 10, 2012

(HealthDay)—Women with atrial fibrillation (AF) have a higher risk of ischemic stroke than men with AF, related in part to differences in the percent time in the therapeutic range (TTR) associated with warfarin anticoagulation ...

Stroke risk similar among men and women smokers worldwide

August 22, 2013

Smoking cigarettes may cause similar stroke risks for men and women, but women smokers may be at greater risk for a more deadly and uncommon type of stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal ...

Women fare worse than men following stroke

February 7, 2014

The good news: More people survive stroke now than 10 years ago due to improved treatment and prevention. The bad news: Women who survive stroke have a worse quality of life than men, according to a study published in the ...

Recommended for you

Heart attack treatment hypothesis 'busted'

July 6, 2015

Researchers have long had reason to hope that blocking the flow of calcium into the mitochondria of heart and brain cells could be one way to prevent damage caused by heart attacks and strokes. But in a study of mice engineered ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.