Can citrus ward off your risk of stroke?

Eating foods that contain vitamin C may reduce your risk of the most common type of hemorrhagic stroke, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014.

Vitamin C is found in fruits and vegetables such as oranges, papaya, peppers, broccoli and strawberries. Hemorrhagic stroke is less common than , but is more often deadly.

The study involved 65 people who had experienced an intracerebral , or a blood vessel rupture inside the brain. They were compared to 65 healthy people. Participants were tested for the levels of vitamin C in their blood. Overall, 41 percent of participants had normal levels of vitamin C, 45 percent showed depleted levels of vitamin C and 14 percent were considered deficient of the vitamin.

On average, the people who had a stroke had depleted levels of vitamin C, while those who had not had a stroke had normal levels of the vitamin.

"Our results show that vitamin C deficiency should be considered a risk factor for this severe type of stroke, as were high , drinking alcohol and being overweight in our study," said study author Stéphane Vannier, MD, with Pontchaillou University Hospital in Rennes, France. "More research is needed to explore specifically how vitamin C may help to reduce stroke risk. For example, the vitamin may regulate blood pressure."

Vannier adds that C appears to have other benefits like creating collagen, a protein found in bones, skin and tissues.

Vitamin C deficiency has also been linked to heart disease.

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marko
not rated yet Feb 14, 2014
Vitamin C is not the only factor that is effective in preventing strokes, from consumption of citrus fruits.

What is often overlooked, even by the discoverer of Vitamin C, is the co-factor enhancement provided by proanthocyanadins found in citrus fruits and other food sources.

Proanthocyanidins are found in nutitional quantities in cocoa, cinnamon and typically purple/black fruits.

It strengthens collogen and improves its elasticity, and improves platelet flow in the blood which is benificial for the neuro/cardiovascular system.

A hot cup of cocoa (not chocolate) a day will keep the doctor away.

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