One dead, babies ill from listeria linked to cheese

February 22, 2014 by Mary Clare Jalonick

One person has died and three newborns have become ill in an outbreak of listeria linked to Hispanic-style cheese.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that the death occurred in California. Seven additional illnesses were reported in Maryland.

All of the Maryland victims reported eating soft or semi-soft Hispanic-style cheese that they purchased at different locations of the same grocery store chain. Listeria was later detected in a sample of cuajada en terron, or fresh cheese curd, purchased at that chain.

The CDC says three of the victims are newborns. Two of those ill are mothers of two of the ill newborns.

The agency says the cheese was probably produced by Roos Foods of Kenton, Del.

Explore further: Listeria food poisoning hits elderly, moms-to-be hardest: CDC

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