New food labels would highlight calories and sugar

by Mary Clare Jalonick

(AP)—Those "Nutrition Facts" labels on nearly every food package in grocery stores are getting a new look.

Calories would be in larger, bolder type, and consumers for the first time would know whether foods had added sugars under label changes being proposed by the Obama administration.

Serving sizes would be updated to make them more realistic. A serving of , for example, would double to a full cup, closer to what people actually eat.

The new nutrition labels are likely several years away.

While fat was the focus two decades ago when the labels first were introduced, nutritionists are now more concerned with how many calories we eat.

First lady Michelle Obama is joining the Food and Drug Administration in announcing the proposed changes Thursday.

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