Glance: US smoking over 50 years

by The Associated Press

Some key events and adult smoking rates in the fight over tobacco during the last 50 years in the U.S.:

1964: U.S. surgeon general report concludes smoking causes lung cancer.

1965: Warning labels required on ; adult smoking rate 42.4 percent.

1971: TV and radio commercials for cigarettes banned.

1972: Airlines told to provide no-smoking sections.

1987: Aspen, Colorado, becomes first U.S. city to ban smoking in restaurants; adult smoking rate 28.8 percent.

1988: Smoking banned on short domestic airline flights.

1998: Forty-six states reach $206 billion settlement with ; adult smoking rate 24.1 percent.

2000: Smoking prohibited on international flights.

2009: Food and Drug Administration authorized to regulate tobacco products; adult smoking rate 20.6 percent.

2014: U.S. surgeon general report adds more diseases to the long list of cigarettes' harms, urges new resolve to make the next generation a smoke-free generation; adult rate about 18 percent.

Related Stories

Surgeon general urges new resolve to end smoking (Update)

date Jan 17, 2014

One in 13 children could see their lives shortened by smoking unless the nation takes more aggressive action to end the tobacco epidemic, the U.S. Surgeon General said Friday—even as, astonishingly, scientists ...

Recommended for you

Smokers who use e-cigarettes less likely to quit

date Apr 16, 2015

The rapid increase in use of e-cigarettes has led to heated debates between opponents who question the safety of these devices and proponents who claim the battery-operated products are a useful cessation tool. A study, published ...

Evidence that synthetic drugs can cause cancer

date Apr 16, 2015

Almost weekly, a new synthetic psychoactive drug comes onto the market somewhere in Europe that can be ordered legally and easily, for example as an incense blend, via the Internet. Synthetic cannabinoids ...

Benefits of heroin treatment for drug users

date Apr 14, 2015

Drug users who do not benefit from conventional treatments for heroin addiction should be able to access the drug through the health system, urges a Canadian expert in The BMJ today.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.