Hispanic stroke patients less likely to receive clot-busting drugs in

February 13, 2014

Hispanic stroke patients admitted to hospitals in the border states of California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas were less likely than non-Hispanics in the same border states to receive clot-busting drugs and more likely to die, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2014.

Researchers analyzed for Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients according to demographics and clinical characteristics in states bordering Mexico and states not on the Mexican border. They found:

  • Of the nearly 35,000 Hispanic stroke patients, 21,130 were admitted in border states and 13,774 in non-border states.
  • Only 4.8 percent of Hispanic patients in border state hospitals received clot-busting drugs compared to 5.7 percent of non-Hispanic patients in border state hospitals.
  • Hispanic stroke patients were 30 percent more likely than non-Hispanics to die in border state hospitals.
  • There was no notable difference in death rates between Hispanic and non-Hispanic stroke patients in non-border state hospitals. Researchers say more study is needed to determine why clot-busters are underutilized in Hispanics admitted in border states but not in other states.

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