Second-most common breast cancer subtype may benefit from personalized treatment approach

Second-most common breast cancer subtype may benefit from personalized treatment approach
Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) cells (blue/purple) fill the entire image, as they have formed a large lump or mass in the patient's breast. Credit: UPCI

The second-most common type of breast cancer is a very different disease than the most common and appears to be a good candidate for a personalized approach to treatment, according to a multidisciplinary team led by University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) scientists.

Invasive lobular , which is characterized by a unique growth pattern in breast tissue that fails to form a lump, has distinct genetic markers that indicate there may be benefits from drug therapies beyond those typically prescribed for the more common invasive ductal carcinoma. The results will be published in the March 1 issue of the journal Cancer Research.

Patients with invasive lobular carcinoma are typically treated through surgical removal of the , followed by chemotherapy or hormone therapy or both, usually with the estrogen-mimicking drug tamoxifen or estrogen-lowering aromatase inhibitors, the same as patients with .

"However, recent analyses have shown that a subset of patients with lobular carcinoma receive less benefit from adjuvant tamoxifen than patients with ductal carcinoma," said senior author Steffi Oesterreich, Ph.D., professor at UPCI, a partner with UPMC CancerCenter, and director of education at the Women's Cancer Research Center. "Our study, the largest of its kind, indicates an issue with the estrogen receptors inside lobular carcinoma cells and points to a potential target for drug therapy in future clinical trials, which we are developing."

Second-most common breast cancer subtype may benefit from personalized treatment approach
Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) cells (blue/purple) invade healthy breast tissue (pink) in the characteristic 'single-file' manner, and do not form an easily detectable lump or mass. Credit: UPCI

The UPCI study, funded by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and the U.S. Department of Defense, included collaborations across multiple disciplines, ranging from biostatistics and biomedical informatics to pathology and human genetics, in order to produce results with the potential for rapid translation into clinical therapies.

"In addition to its potential clinical implications, the study highlights the need for more and better models mimicking invasive lobular cancer that can be used for laboratory studies," said lead author Matthew Sikora, Ph.D., a postdoctoral associate at UPCI.

"Because lobular carcinomas account for only 10 to 15 percent of breast cancers, while ductal carcinomas make up nearly 80 percent, lobular carcinomas are a less attractive option for laboratory study," said Dr. Sikora. "However, 30,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with lobular carcinoma every year, so there is a great need for further study of this disease."

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Breast cancer type linked to paternal cancer

Nov 28, 2011

The risk of breast cancer is increased by genetic and lifestyle factors such as the inherited BRCA2 gene, age of having first child, or use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). New research published in BioMed Central's ...

Alcohol intake increases certain types of breast cancer

Aug 23, 2010

Alcohol increases the risk of lobular and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, but not necessarily invasive ductal carcinomas, according to a study published August 23 online in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Recommended for you

Unraveling the 'black ribbon' around lung cancer

Apr 17, 2014

It's not uncommon these days to find a colored ribbon representing a disease. A pink ribbon is well known to signify breast cancer. But what color ribbon does one think of with lung cancer?

User comments