Tissue repair drug helps heal diabetic foot ulcers

Patients were twice as likely to have a diabetic foot ulcer heal within eight weeks when they were treated with a tissue repair drug versus a placebo, according to new research accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Foot ulcers are a common complication from diabetes than can lead to hospitalization and lower limb amputation. In 2006, about 65,700 non-traumatic lower-limb amputations were performed in people with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Up to 85 percent of amputations can be avoided when ulcers are prevented from forming or are treated successfully, said one of the study's authors, Francesco Squadrito, MD, of the University of Messina in Gazzi Messina, Italy.

"Foot ulcers are a dangerous and expensive complication for people with diabetes, and current treatments such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy are costly and can have side effects," Squadrito said. "Our study showed for the first time that a pharmacological approach can improve wound healing in people with diabetes."

In the prospective randomized, double-blinded, -controlled clinical trial, 216 participants with free of visible infection were assigned to receive either the tissue repair drug polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) or a placebo. Participants received injections of either PDRN or a placebo for eight weeks and were monitored for an additional four weeks for any change in the ulcer.

After two months, 37 percent of the patients who were treated with PDRN had their ulcers completely closed, compared with nearly 19 percent of the patients who received the placebo. Study subjects reported few side effects from PDRN, Squadrito said.

"This approach could revolutionize the treatment of diabetic – a main cause of hospital admissions in the developed world," he said. "An estimated 382 million people worldwide have , and it is crucial to find effective treatment options for hard-to-heal ulcers and other complications facing millions of patients."

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fewer Americans undergoing lower limb amputation

Jul 10, 2013

There have been dramatic decreases in the number and severity of lower limb amputations over the past decade, according to a new study published in the July 2013 issue of Foot & Ankle International. At the same time, orthop ...

Recommended for you

Evidence-based recs issued for systemic care in psoriasis

18 hours ago

(HealthDay)—For appropriately selected patients with psoriasis, combining biologics with other systemic treatments, including phototherapy, oral medications, or other biologic, may result in greater efficacy ...

Bacteria in caramel apples kills at least four in US

18 hours ago

A listeria outbreak believed to originate from commercially packaged caramel apples has killed at least four people in the United States and sickened 28 people since November, officials said Friday.

Steroid-based treatment may answer needs of pediatric EoE patients

19 hours ago

A new formulation of oral budesonide suspension, a steroid-based treatment, is safe and effective in treating pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal ...

Discovery of genes that predispose a severe form of COPD

21 hours ago

A study by Ramcés Falfán-Valencia, researcher at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases (INER), found that the mestizo Mexican population has a number of variations in certain genes that predispose ...

On the environmental trail of food pathogens

22 hours ago

Tracking one of the deadliest food contamination organisms through produce farms and natural environments alike, Cornell microbiologists are showing how to use big datasets to predict where the next outbreak could start.

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Arizona Orthotics
not rated yet Feb 27, 2014
This is fantastic, but lets not forget the need to avoid ulceration as the first line of defense. For your consideration: http://www.prweb....7410.htm

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.