Ventilatory abnormalities persist for adults born prematurely

Ventilatory abnormalities persist for adults born prematurely

(HealthDay)—Those born prematurely continue to have abnormal ventilatory responses to hypoxia and hyperoxia as adults, which may have clinical consequences such as sleep disorders, according to a study published in the Feb. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Melissa L. Bates, Ph.D., from the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and colleagues measured the ventilatory responses to five minutes of hypoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen of 0.12) and hyperoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen of 1.0) in 13 adults born prematurely, as well as in age-matched adults born at full term.

The researchers found that, although the two groups had similar pulmonary function and , the preterm adults had a significantly reduced hypoxic ventilatory response and two preterm adults hypoventilated. Sixty seconds of hyperoxia induced respiratory depression in only eight preterm adults compared with all full-term adults. Preterm adults also had a significantly lower mean response to hyperoxia (−3.0 versus −29.6 percent).

"We speculate that these underappreciated abnormalities in ventilatory control may have important clinical consequences, including an increased risk of disordered breathing during sleep and in response to high altitude and anesthesia," Bates and colleagues write.

More information: Full Text

Related Stories

Insulin sensitivity lower in adults born preterm

date Sep 27, 2012

(HealthDay)—Middle-aged adults who were born preterm, even moderately preterm (32 to 36 weeks' gestation), are less insulin sensitive compared with adults who were born at term, according to research published ...

Neuroplasticity reduced in teens born prematurely

date Dec 10, 2012

(HealthDay)—Adolescents who were born prematurely have reduced neuroplasticity, which may explain their motor, learning, and memory difficulties, according to a study published in the Nov. 14 issue of the ...

Teenagers' brains affected by preterm birth

date Nov 13, 2012

New research at the University of Adelaide has demonstrated that teenagers born prematurely may suffer brain development problems that directly affect their memory and learning abilities.

Recommended for you

MSF fighting cholera outbreak in Tanzania refugee camps

date 14 minutes ago

Medical charity Medecins sans Frontieres (MSF, Doctors Without Borders) said Sunday it had launched emergency treatment centres in Tanzania, where thousands of Burundians fleeing unrest have been hit by cholera.

Bacteria blamed in indigenous Mexican baby deaths

date May 23, 2015

Bacteria—and not a contaminated vaccine as initially suspected—were to blame for the recent deaths of two Mexican babies and for sickening 29 others, according to an official investigation.

Explainer: What is Chagas disease?

date May 22, 2015

According to an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), in a Los Angeles clinic treating patients with heart failure, about 20% of Latin American patients have Chagas disease. What is that?, y ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.