Adjunct social media improves contraceptive knowledge

Adjunct social media improves contraceptive knowledge

(HealthDay)—Use of social media in addition to standard contraceptive education is associated with improved patient contraceptive knowledge, according to research published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Jason D. Kofinas, M.D., from the New York Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues assessed whether , specifically Facebook, is an effective tool for improving contraceptive knowledge in a cohort of English-speaking women aged 18 to 45 years. Participants were randomized to a trial of standard contraceptive education and pamphlet (74 women) or standard contraceptive education and Facebook (69 women) information for contraception counseling. The Contraceptive Knowledge Inventory was used to assess contraceptive knowledge before and after the intervention.

The researchers found that, in the Facebook group, the median raw postintervention Contraceptive Knowledge Inventory score was significantly higher than in the pamphlet group (15 versus 12; P < 0.001). The Facebook group also had a significantly higher percentage increase in the Contraceptive Knowledge Inventory score (36 versus 12 percent; P < 0.001). The Facebook group reported significantly higher participant satisfaction with counseling method (median, 10 versus 6; P < 0.001). Postintervention, participant contraceptive preference was significantly greater for long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) in the Facebook group versus the pamphlet group (57 versus 35 percent; P = 0.01).

"Social media as an adjunct to traditional in-office counseling improves patient contraceptive knowledge and increases patient preference for LARCs," the authors write.

More information: Full Text

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

CDC releases modified contraception recommendations

Jun 20, 2013

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued modified recommendations for health care providers regarding the safe and effective use of contraceptive methods; the report, "U.S. ...

Recommended for you

Vitamin D may not prevent return of vaginosis after all

15 hours ago

(HealthDay)—A new study suggests that high doses of vitamin D may not help prevent the return of bacterial vaginosis (BV). The research was published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Eating disorders linked to adverse perinatal outcomes

Oct 22, 2014

(HealthDay)—Maternal eating disorders are associated with adverse pregnancy, obstetric, and perinatal health outcomes, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & ...

Large variation in cesarean rates across US hospitals

Oct 21, 2014

Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States. US cesarean rates increased from 20.7% in 1996 to 32.9% in 2009 but have since stabilized, with 1.3 million American women having had a cesarean ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.