Researchers develop antibody-targeted treatment for recurrent small-cell lung cancer

Researchers at Norris Cotton Cancer Center have found an antibody that may be used in future treatments for recurrent small-cell lung cancer, which currently has no effective therapy.

The mouse monoclonal antibody they have developed, MAG-1, targets the ProAVP surface marker. When given alone, it significantly slows the growth of tumor xenografts of human recurrent small-cell in mice. The study, "Growth Impairment of Small-Cell Cancer by Targeting Pro-Vasopressin with MAG-1 Antibody," was recently published online in Frontiers in Oncology.

"We are developing methods of antibody-targeted treatment for recurrent small-cell lung cancer," said lead author William G. North, PhD, professor of Physiology at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and a member of the Norris Cotton Cancer Center. "Targeting with a humanized MAG-1 can likely be effective, especially when given in combination with chemotherapy, for treating a deadly disease for which there is no ."

North says his group has already generated a human chimeric form of MAG-1 that is equally effective as mouse MAG-1, and they are now generating a humanized form for use in patients.

Provided by The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Monoclonal antibody targets, kills leukemia cells

Mar 25, 2013

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego Moores Cancer Center have identified a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets and directly kills chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells.

Recommended for you

Medical marijuana helpful for cancer-linked symptoms

8 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Cannabis and cannabinoid pharmaceuticals can be helpful for nausea and vomiting, pain, and weight loss associated with cancer, according to research published online Dec. 10 in CA: A Cancer Jo ...

Mutations need help from aging tissue to cause leukemia

12 hours ago

Why are older people at higher risk for developing cancer? Prevailing opinion holds that, over time, your body's cells accumulate DNA damage and that eventually this damage catches up with the body in a way ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.