Researchers develop antibody-targeted treatment for recurrent small-cell lung cancer

March 4, 2014

Researchers at Norris Cotton Cancer Center have found an antibody that may be used in future treatments for recurrent small-cell lung cancer, which currently has no effective therapy.

The mouse monoclonal antibody they have developed, MAG-1, targets the ProAVP surface marker. When given alone, it significantly slows the growth of tumor xenografts of human recurrent small-cell in mice. The study, "Growth Impairment of Small-Cell Cancer by Targeting Pro-Vasopressin with MAG-1 Antibody," was recently published online in Frontiers in Oncology.

"We are developing methods of antibody-targeted treatment for recurrent small-cell lung cancer," said lead author William G. North, PhD, professor of Physiology at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and a member of the Norris Cotton Cancer Center. "Targeting with a humanized MAG-1 can likely be effective, especially when given in combination with chemotherapy, for treating a deadly disease for which there is no ."

North says his group has already generated a human chimeric form of MAG-1 that is equally effective as mouse MAG-1, and they are now generating a humanized form for use in patients.

Explore further: Monoclonal antibody targets, kills leukemia cells

Related Stories

Monoclonal antibody targets, kills leukemia cells

March 25, 2013

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego Moores Cancer Center have identified a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets and directly kills chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells.

Recommended for you


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.