Going live with EHR leads to frustrations, productivity hit

Going live with EHR leads to frustrations, productivity hit

(HealthDay)—Implementing an electronic health record (EHR) system takes excessive physician and staff time and disrupts practice, according to survey results published Feb. 24 in Medical Economics.

According to results from the two-year Medical Economics EHR Best Practices Study, 96 percent of the participating physicians reported excessive time to implement, 89 percent noted a disruption to the practice, and only 37 percent said they were truly ready on the go-live date.

To minimize the stress of implementing an EHR system, Medical Economics suggests the following steps: (1) review the workflow process map prior to implementation; (2) set a goal of retiring the paper version of charts by the patient's second visit; (3) make a decision whether to hire a scribe or temporary staff to preload, scan, or manually enter patient records; and (4) conduct a practice run of the EHR before going live as part of training. Additionally, have on-site technical support present during the first few days and consider running both the old and new billing systems simultaneously to test certain claims and payers.

"Consider that physicians are faced with integrating records and trying to achieve a level of functionality with the system," said the EHR Best Practices Study leader George G. Ellis Jr., M.D., according to the Medical Economics article. "At the same time, they are learning how to use it while examining patients, diagnosing conditions, and treating them. Workflow adjustments add new complications to an already complicated process."

More information: More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

EHR systems meeting meaningful use criteria beneficial

Sep 18, 2013

(HealthDay)—Most electronic health record (EHR) systems meet meaningful use criteria, and these systems are associated with time-saving and other benefits, according to a September data brief published ...

User satisfaction with electronic health records down

May 10, 2013

(HealthDay)—Since 2010, there has been a decrease in the satisfaction and usability ratings for certified electronic health records (EHRs), according to survey results presented by the American College ...

Most doctors feel they are under-using mobile apps

Jun 11, 2013

(HealthDay)—Most physicians feel they are not maximizing use of mobile applications, and would utilize additional electronic health record (EHR) functionalities if they were available, according to poll ...

Recommended for you

Demographics impact family physicians' care of children

Sep 12, 2014

(HealthDay)—Demographic and geographic factors influence whether family physicians provide care for children, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Estimate: 3 in 10 NFL retirees face cognitive woes (Update)

Sep 12, 2014

Nearly three in 10 former NFL players will develop at least moderate neurocognitive problems and qualify for payments under the proposed $765 million concussion settlement, according to data prepared for ex-players' lawyers ...

Physician describes impact of malpractice suit

Sep 12, 2014

(HealthDay)—A family doctor who was involved in a malpractice suit describes the impact on her practice of medicine in an article published online in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Me ...

Report outlines 'must-have' sexual health services for men

Sep 12, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—Compared with women, American men have worse access to reproductive and sexual health care, research shows, a disparity fueled in part by the lack of standard clinical guidelines on the types and timing ...

New report finds a healthy well-being among Chinese children

Sep 12, 2014

A new study of children's well-being in Shanghai finds that first-graders are socially and emotionally healthy, with most performing average or above average academically. The study, by the New York University-East China ...

User comments