Cutting HIV in drug users can benefit others' AIDS mortality

March 26, 2014
Cutting HIV in drug users can benefit others' AIDS mortality

(HealthDay)—Efforts to curb HIV transmission among people who inject drugs (PWID) and non-injecting drug users (NIDUs) may reduce AIDS and AIDS-related mortality among heterosexuals, according to a study published in the April issue of the Annals of Epidemiology.

Samuel R. Friedman, Ph.D., from the National Development and Research Institutes in New York City, and colleagues used data for 96 large, U.S. metropolitan areas to assess how the earlier epidemic of HIV-infected PWID and men who have sex with men (MSM) related to later AIDS incidence and mortality among heterosexuals.

The researchers found that the population density of HIV+ PWID and of NIDUs were positively related. Prevention programs for PWID negatively related to later AIDS incidence among heterosexuals and later mortality among heterosexuals living with AIDS. There was no association found between these outcomes and HIV+ MSM population density and for MSM.

"More research is needed at metropolitan area, network, and individual levels into HIV bridging across key populations and how interventions in one key population affect HIV epidemics in other key populations," the authors write.

Explore further: HIV 'epidemics' emerging in MENA region: study

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

HIV 'epidemics' emerging in MENA region: study

August 3, 2011

The AIDS virus is spreading like an epidemic in some Middle East and North African countries because of homosexual encounters between men, a study warned on Wednesday.

Recommended for you

Targeting HIV in semen to shut down AIDS

August 18, 2015

There may be two new ways to fight AIDS—using a heat shock protein or a small molecule - to attack fibrils in semen associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during the initial phases of infection, according ...

Vitamin D status related to immune response to HIV-1

June 15, 2015

Vitamin D plays an important part in the human immune response and deficiency can leave individuals less able to fight infections like HIV-1. Now an international team of researchers has found that high-dose vitamin D supplementation ...

HVTN 505 vaccine induced antibodies nonspecific for HIV

July 30, 2015

A study by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Duke University helps explain why the candidate vaccine used in the HVTN 505 clinical trial was not protective against HIV infection ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.