Riding with impaired driver ups teen risk of driving impaired

Riding with impaired driver ups teen risk of driving impaired

(HealthDay)—Teenagers exposed to alcohol/drug impaired driving (riding while impaired [RWI]) have an increased likelihood of driving while alcohol/drug impaired (DWI) themselves, according to a study published online March 17 in Pediatrics.

Kaigang Li, Ph.D., from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues used data from waves 1, 2, and 3 of the NEXT Generation Study to examine the correlation between RWI and DWI. Participants included a nationally representative sample of 10th graders.

The researchers found that, compared with those reporting never RWI, teenagers exposed to RWI at wave 1, wave 2, and wave 3 were substantially more likely to DWI (adjusted odds ratios [aORs], 21.12, 19.97, and 30.52, respectively; all P < 0.001). Similar results were seen for those who reported RWI at one wave, two waves, and all three waves (aORs, 10.89, 34.34, and 127.43; all P < 0.001), compared with those reporting never RWI. Compared with those who were licensed at wave 3, teenagers who reported driving licensure at wave 1 were more likely to DWI (aOR, 1.83; P < 0.05).

"The findings suggest that RWI and early licensure could be important prevention targets," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Obstetric outcomes for women with asthma evaluated

Feb 12, 2013

(HealthDay)—Women with asthma have significantly higher odds for nearly all obstetric complications, according to a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Fetal alcohol exposure affects brain structure in children

Nov 25, 2012

Children exposed to alcohol during fetal development exhibit changes in brain structure and metabolism that are visible using various imaging techniques, according to a new study being presented today at the annual meeting ...

Recommended for you

Youth are quietly losing their hearing

Aug 27, 2014

Children and teens constantly plugged into personal listening devices, such as phones, computers or music players, could be harming their ears without realizing it, says a Purdue University audiologist.

Quality childcare leads to benefits at school age

Aug 26, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—Children who receive a quality childcare experience at age 2-3 are more likely to be attentive and better able to deal with their emotions as they start school, according to new research from the University ...

User comments