Implanted hearing device approved

March 20, 2014

(HealthDay)—The first implantable device for adults with a severe or profound form of a condition called "sensorineural hearing loss" has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Sensorineural hearing loss, the most common type, occurs when the 's cochlea is damaged. Aging, heredity, loud noise, certain drugs and some types of illness are common causes, the FDA said.

Symptoms of sensorineural hearing loss may include difficulty hearing faint sounds, problems understanding people with higher-pitched voices, and inability to hear high-pitched sirens, such as those emitted by a smoke detector or ambulance.

The Nucleus Hybrid L24 Cochlear Implant System may offer hope to people with inner ear damage who don't benefit from conventional hearing aids, the FDA said Thursday in a news release.

The device was evaluated in clinical studies involving 50 people with severe to profound high-frequency hearing loss. Common adverse reactions included low-frequency , ringing in the ears (tinnitus), electrode malfunction and dizziness.

The device is produced by Cochlear Ltd., based in Australia.

Explore further: Know the types of hearing loss to find the right treatment

More information: The FDA has more about hearing loss.

Related Stories

Tackling hearing loss

February 27, 2013

Some 16 per cent of European adults suffer from hearing loss that is severe enough to adversely affect their daily life. Hearing loss impacts on one's ability to communicate - to hear, process sound, and respond - which can ...

Imbalanced hearing is more than a mild disability

March 12, 2014

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received a five-year, $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the effects of asymmetric hearing loss in adults and children.

Recommended for you

Bright lighting encourages healthy food choices

May 26, 2016

Dining in dimly lit restaurants has been linked to eating slowly and ultimately eating less than in brighter restaurants, but does lighting also impact how healthfully we order?

Big Data can save lives, says leading cancer expert

May 16, 2016

The sharing of genetic information from millions of cancer patients around the world could be key to revolutionising cancer prevention and care, according to a leading cancer expert from Queen's University Belfast.

New soap to ward off malaria carrying mosquitoes

May 13, 2016

(Medical Xpress)—Gérard Niyondiko along with colleagues Frank Langevin and Lisa Barutel has posted a project on the crowd source funding site ulule for a product called Faso Soap. They claim the soap can cut in half the ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.