Indoor air pollution tied to asthma, asthma-related symptoms

Indoor air pollution tied to asthma, asthma-related symptoms

(HealthDay)—Indoor air pollution, specifically mold and environmental tobacco smoke, is associated with asthma and asthma-related respiratory symptoms in middle-aged adults, according to a study published online Feb. 12 in Respirology.

Desiree Mészáros, from the University of Tasmania in Hobart, and colleagues examined correlations between indoor sources with phenotypes and asthma-related in a cohort of 5,729 middle-aged adults. Participants had completed respiratory and home environment questionnaires as part of the 2004 survey of the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study.

The researchers identified significant correlations for recent mold in the home with current asthma, wheeze, and nocturnal chest tightness (odds ratios [ORs], 1.26, 1.34, and 1.30, respectively). Significant trends for current asthma, wheeze, and nocturnal chest tightness correlated with more rooms affected by mold. On stratification by atopy and gender, the correlation between recent mold and current non-atopic asthma was only seen in males (OR, 3.73). Significant correlations were seen for home environmental with doctor-diagnosed asthma (OR, 1.25), wheeze (OR, 1.69), nocturnal chest tightness (OR, 1.54), and with current asthma only in non-smokers (OR, 2.09) and males (OR, 1.74). There was a negative correlation for reverse cycle air conditioning with doctor-diagnosed asthma (OR, 0.84; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.70 to 1.00). No correlations were seen for electric or gas stove use with asthma phenotype or asthma-related respiratory symptoms.

"In middle age, reducing home exposure to mold and environmental tobacco smoke might reduce asthma and asthma-related respiratory symptoms," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Household mould a trigger for increased asthma risk

Feb 12, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—Reducing the presence of mould in the home may reduce asthma in middle-aged adults according to new research led by the University of Melbourne in collaboration with the University of Tasmania, ...

Obese children more susceptible to asthma from air pollution

Jan 22, 2014

Obese children exposed to high levels of air pollutants were nearly three times as likely to have asthma, compared with non-obese children and lower levels of pollution exposure, report researchers at Columbia University ...

Nearly one 1 in 12 in US have asthma: study

May 03, 2011

Asthma cases in the United States have risen 12.3 percent since 2001, and nearly one in 12, or almost 25 million Americans, are stricken with the chronic respiratory disease, the government said Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Sierra Leone reaches final day of Ebola lockdown

11 minutes ago

Frustrated residents complained of food shortages in some neighborhoods of Sierra Leone's capital on Sunday as the country reached the third and final day of a sweeping, unprecedented lockdown designed to ...

Sierra Leone faces criticism over Ebola shutdown

Sep 20, 2014

Sierra Leone began the second day of a 72-hour nationwide shutdown aimed at containing the spread of the deadly Ebola virus on Saturday amid criticism that the action was a poorly planned publicity stunt.

Presence of peers ups health workers' hand hygiene

Sep 19, 2014

(HealthDay)—The presence of other health care workers improves hand hygiene adherence, according to a study published in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

Sierra Leone streets deserted as shutdown begins

Sep 19, 2014

Sierra Leone's normally chaotic capital resembled a ghost town on Friday as residents were confined to their homes for the start of a three-day lockdown aimed at halting the deadly Ebola epidemic.

User comments