Researchers link body temperature to relapsing-remitting MS and fatigue

March 18, 2014

Kessler Foundation researchers have demonstrated for the first time ever that body temperature is elevated endogenously in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and linked to worse fatigue. The article was published ahead of print on Feb. 21, 2014 in Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. Sumowski J, Leavitt V: Body temperature is elevated and linked to fatigue in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, even without heat exposure.

Researchers measured body temperature in 50 patients with RRMS, 40 matched healthy controls, and 22 patients with secondary progressive MS (SPMS). They looked at whether resting body temperature was elevated in patients with RRMS and whether elevation was linked to fatigue, a prevalent, disabling, and recalcitrant symptom in this population.

"We found that body temperature was elevated among patients with RRMS and linked to worse fatigue," reported Dr. Sumowski, research scientist in Neuropsychology & Neuroscience Research. "Our findings support those of randomized controlled trials of cooling garments and antipyretics, which have been shown to effectively reduce fatigue in MS. More studies are needed to investigate the complex relationships among , body temperature and inflammatory processes in RRMS."

Explore further: Tired all the time: Could undiagnosed sleep problems be making MS patients' fatigue worse?

More information: Paper: DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2014.02.004

Recent publications: Sumowski J, Chiaravalloti N, Krch D, et al. Education attenuates the negative impact of traumatic brain injury on cognitive status. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2013;94(12):2562-4. Retrieval practice is a robust memory aid in memory-impaired patients with multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler 2014;95(2):397-400.

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