Neck circumference not tied to subclinical atherosclerosis

March 27, 2014
Neck circumference not tied to subclinical atherosclerosis

(HealthDay)—Neck circumference (NC) is not associated with either coronary or carotid subclinical atherosclerosis, according to a study published online March 19 in Clinical Cardiology.

Yashashwi Pokharel, M.D., from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and colleagues measured NC (midway between the midcervical spine and midanterior neck) in 845 retired National Football League (NFL) players. Carotid ultrasound was used to identify plaque (CAP).

The researchers found that 21 percent of participants had metabolic syndrome (MetS), while 62 and 56 percent, respectively, had (CAC) and CAP. Participants with MetS had a significantly higher median NC compared to those without MetS (P < 0.0001); however, NC was not associated with the presence of CAC or CAP even after adjusting for age, race, and cardiometabolic risk factors (odds ratios: 1.11 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.94 to 1.31] for CAC and 0.96 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.12] for CAP per one-standard deviation increase in NC [3.8 inches]). When the predictor variable was NC indexed to , results were similar.

"In retired NFL players with a high prevalence of CAC and CAP, NC was not associated with coronary or carotid subclinical atherosclerosis," the authors write. "NC may not be the most appropriate risk marker for atherosclerosis."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

Explore further: Coronary artery calcium predicts cardio death in T2DM

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Coronary artery calcium predicts cardio death in T2DM

January 18, 2013

(HealthDay)—In addition to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes, coronary artery calcium (CAC) predicts the risk of cardiovascular death, according to a study published online ...

Fatty liver may directly mediate CAD in metabolic syndrome

January 23, 2013

(HealthDay)—Men and women with fatty liver are more likely to have metabolic syndrome (MetS) with type 2 diabetes, and women with fatty liver are more likely to have MetS with subclinical atherosclerosis, according to research ...

Vitamin D not tied to subclinical atherosclerosis in T1DM

April 12, 2013

(HealthDay)—For individuals with type 1 diabetes, low concentrations of vitamin D metabolites are not associated with an increased risk of subclinical atherosclerosis, according to a study published online March 25 in Diabetes ...

Recommended for you

Heart attack treatment hypothesis 'busted'

July 6, 2015

Researchers have long had reason to hope that blocking the flow of calcium into the mitochondria of heart and brain cells could be one way to prevent damage caused by heart attacks and strokes. But in a study of mice engineered ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.