Rare skin infection traced to NYC fish markets

March 6, 2014

(AP)—Health officials say they have traced a rare skin infection to raw seafood purchased at fish markets in New York City's three Chinatowns.

The Health Department says there have been 30 reported cases of the infection caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium marinum (my-koh-bak-TEER'-ee-uhm muh-REE'-nuhm).

All the victims said they had handled live or raw seafood from Chinatown markets in Manhattan, Brooklyn or Queens.

Symptoms include red, tender lumps and swelling under the skin of their hands or arms. Sometimes people also develop swelling or pain in their hands or and have difficulty moving their fingers.

The Health Department is urging people to wear waterproof gloves when handling raw fish that comes from a Chinatown market.

There is no risk associated with eating the fish.

Explore further: Fish like grouper, barracuda may pose food-poisoning risk

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