Testers say federal health care website runs slow

by Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar

A little patience might be a good idea if you're trying to get covered under President Barack Obama's health care law these last few days before the March 31 deadline.

HealthCare.gov runs slowly when compared with major websites. That's according to an analysis for The Associated Press by Compuware, a company that measures website performance.

The tests from computers used by consumers found that the time it takes the for HealthCare.gov to load averaged nearly nine seconds nationally over a seven-day period that ended Tuesday. The time for leading private health insurance websites averages just under five seconds.

The administration says its own tests show response times of less than half a second.

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Help offered for people who miss Obamacare deadline

Dec 25, 2013

The US government Tuesday offered help for people who were unable to sign up for health insurance through the federal website by the deadline as part of the president's controversial health care reform legislation.

Adding a new baby to plan not easy

Jan 03, 2014

(AP)—Another quirk has surfaced with the Obama administration's new health insurance system: There's no easy way to update your coverage for a new baby and other common life events.

Recommended for you

Patient-centered medical homes reduce costs

15 hours ago

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH), introduced in 2007, is a model of health care that emphasizes personal relationships, team delivery of care, coordination across specialties and care settings, quality ...

New mums still excessively sleepy after four months

16 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—New mums are being urged to be cautious about returning to work too quickly, after a QUT study found one in two were still excessively sleepy four months after giving birth.

It's time to address the health of men around the world

17 hours ago

All over the world, men die younger than women and do worse on a host of health indicators, yet policy makers rarely focus on this "men's health gap" or adopt programs aimed at addressing it, according to an international ...

User comments