AANS: Stem cells may aid stroke patients

April 10, 2014
AANS: stem cells may aid stroke patients

(HealthDay)—Intraparenchymal transplantation of human modified bone marrow-derived stromal cells in chronic stroke patients is safe, feasible, and results in improved neurologic function, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, held from April 5 to 9 in San Francisco.

Gary K. Steinberg, M.D., Ph.D., from Stanford University in California, and colleagues conducted a two-center open-label safety, dose escalation feasibility study in the first North American trial of intraparenchymal transplantation of bone marrow-derived cell therapy (six each with 2.5M, 5M and I0M cells) for chronic (18 individuals; 18 to 75 years old; six to 60 months post subcortical middle cerebral artery ).

The researchers found that over the course of follow-up (more than six months in 16 patients and more than 12 months in 12 patients) there were three serious adverse events (SAEs) related to the surgery, but not to the cells (seizure, subdural hematoma, pneumonia), and two SAEs unrelated to either surgery or cells (, delayed new ). There were no changes in cytokine levels, human leukocyte antigen antibody levels, and peripheral blood mononuclear cell function. Assessment scales (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, European Stroke Scale, Fugl-Meyer) all showed a significant benefit in neurologic outcomes. Within 24 hours of surgery, two patients showed remarkable improvement in their motor function, effects which have been sustained during follow-up (20 months and five months).

"Although this was primarily a safety study, we found a significant recovery of neurologic function in patients overall at six months that is sustained at one year," Steinberg said in a statement.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the medical device and regenerative medicine industries.

Explore further: Stem cells show promise for stroke recovery

More information: Press Release
More Information

Related Stories

Stem cells show promise for stroke recovery

April 7, 2014

(HealthDay)—In an early test, researchers report they've safely injected stem cells into the brains of 18 patients who had suffered strokes. And two of the patients showed significant improvement.

Stem cells aid recovery from stroke

January 27, 2013

Stem cells from bone marrow or fat improve recovery after stroke in rats, finds a study published in BioMed Central's open access journal Stem Cell Research & Therapy. Treatment with stem cells improved the amount of brain ...

Recommended for you

Neuro chip records brain cell activity

October 26, 2016

Brain functions are controlled by millions of brain cells. However, in order to understand how the brain controls functions, such as simple reflexes or learning and memory, we must be able to record the activity of large ...

Can a brain-computer interface convert your thoughts to text?

October 25, 2016

Ever wonder what it would be like if a device could decode your thoughts into actual speech or written words? While this might enhance the capabilities of already existing speech interfaces with devices, it could be a potential ...

The current state of psychobiotics

October 25, 2016

Now that we know that gut bacteria can speak to the brain—in ways that affect our mood, our appetite, and even our circadian rhythms—the next challenge for scientists is to control this communication. The science of psychobiotics, ...

After blindness, the adult brain can learn to see again

October 25, 2016

More than 40 million people worldwide are blind, and many of them reach this condition after many years of slow and progressive retinal degeneration. The development of sophisticated prostheses or new light-responsive elements, ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

not rated yet Apr 11, 2014
Well derr. They've been saying that for 20 years now!!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.