Drugmaker developing abuse-deterrent painkiller

The San Diego company that makes the powerful new prescription painkiller Zohydro is selling off its migraine therapy business to focus on developing abuse-resistant forms of Zohydro.

Zogenix Chief Executive Officer Roger Hawley said the sale will help the company focus on the launch of Zohydro ER while providing capital "to continue the development of two abuse-deterrent formulations" of the opioid.

The company announced in November it would pursue an abuse-deterrent form of the drug.

Health officials around the country worry addicts will crush Zohydro capsules and then snort or inject the drug to get high.

Citing such worries, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick tried to ban the drug, but a blocked the state from enforcing the ban. Patrick has since announced new restrictions on the .

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