Gay men divided over use of HIV prevention drug

April 6, 2014 by David Crary

A drug hailed as a lifesaver for many people infected by HIV is at the heart of a rancorous debate among gay men, AIDS activists and health professionals over its potential for protecting uninfected men who engage in gay sex without using condoms.

Many doctors and activists see immense promise for such preventive use of the drug Truvada, and are campaigning hard to raise awareness of it as a crucial step toward reducing new HIV infections, which now total about 50,000 a year in the U.S. Recent efforts range from think-tank forums to a festive event at a New York City bar featuring popular drag queens.

Yet others say such efforts tempt some condom users to abandon that layer of protection and expose them to other .

Explore further: High-risk heterosexuals should take HIV prevention pill, too

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