Navy OKs changes for submariners' sleep schedules

April 20, 2014 by Michael Melia
In this Jan. 13, 2014 photo, the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Scranton returns to Naval Station Norfolk, Va., from a regularly scheduled deployment. Scientists at the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory in Groton, Conn., concluded submarine sailors, who traditionally begin a new workday every 18 hours, show less fatigue on a 24-hour schedule. The first submarine to try the new schedule on a full deployment was the Scranton, led by Cmdr. Seth Burton, who said he found that the more consistent sleep pattern made up for any effects from working slightly longer shifts. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy photo, Shannon D. Barnwell)

The U.S. Navy has endorsed changes to submarine sailors' schedules based on research into sleep patterns by a military laboratory in Connecticut.

With no sunlight to set day apart from night on a submarine, the Navy for decades has staggered sailors' working hours on schedules with little resemblance to life above the ocean's surface.

But the scientists at the Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory concluded submarine sailors, who traditionally begin a new workday every 18 hours, show less fatigue on a 24-hour schedule.

The first to try the new on a full deployment was the USS Scranton, led by Cmdr. Seth Burton. He said he found during the seven-month deployment that the more consistent sleep pattern made up for any effects of working slightly longer shifts.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Older people getting smarter, but not fitter

August 31, 2015

Older populations are scoring better on cognitive tests than people of the same age did in the past —a trend that could be linked to higher education rates and increased use of technology in our daily lives, say IIASA population ...

Higher intelligence score means better physical performance

August 14, 2015

New research reveals a distinct association between male intelligence in early adulthood and their subsequent midlife physical performance. The higher intelligence score, the better physical performance, the study reveals. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.