Risk for nonelective thoracic aortic sx up for uninsured

April 16, 2014
Risk for nonelective thoracic aortic sx up for uninsured

(HealthDay)—Uninsured patients have an increased risk of nonelective thoracic aortic operations, and have increased risks of major morbidity or mortality, according to a study published online April 8 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Nicholas D. Andersen, M.D., from the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., and colleagues conducted an observational study to examine whether are more likely to require nonelective thoracic aortic operation. A total of 51,282 patients who underwent thoracic aortic surgery from 2007 to 2011 were identified from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database and were stratified according to and age.

The researchers found that the need for nonelective thoracic aortic operation was lowest for privately insured patients (36.6 percent) and highest for uninsured patients (71.7 percent). Compared with patients with , the adjusted risks of nonelective operation were elevated for uninsured patients (adjusted risk ratios, 1.77 and 1.46 for those aged younger than 65 years and aged 65 years and older, respectively), and for Medicaid patients aged younger than 65 years (adjusted risk ratio, 1.18). For all patients aged younger than 65 years without private insurance, the adjusted odds of major morbidity and mortality were increased (adjusted risk ratios, 1.13 to 1.27, respectively).

"Insurance status was associated with acuity of presentation and major morbidity and mortality for thoracic aortic operations," the authors write. "Efforts to reduce insurance-based disparities in the care of with seem warranted and may reduce the incidence of aortic emergencies and improve outcomes after thoracic aortic surgery."

Explore further: Higher acute aortic dissection risk with lower-volume care

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Conserving blood cuts transfusions in aortic valve surgery

January 7, 2014

(HealthDay)—A blood conservation strategy (BCS) reduces red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) without increasing mortality or morbidity, according to research published ...

Transcatheter valve implantation benefits even very elderly

January 10, 2014

(HealthDay)—Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is associated with acceptable clinical outcomes, even among very elderly patients, according to a study published in the January issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Recommended for you

No new heart muscle cells in mice after the newborn period

November 5, 2015

A new study from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet shows that new heart muscle cells in mice are mainly formed directly after birth. After the neonatal period the number of heart muscle cells does not change, and A new study ...

Nanotechnology could spur new heart treatment

October 29, 2015

A new nanoparticle developed by University of Michigan researchers could be the key to a targeted therapy for cardiac arrhythmia, a condition that causes the heart to beat erratically and can lead to heart attack and stroke.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.