Salmonella decline seen in food poisoning report

by Mike Stobbe

The government's latest report card on food poisoning is out, and it has some good news: a drop in illnesses from salmonella.

Last year, salmonella cases fell 9 percent, compared to the previous three years. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that's the largest drop in a decade.

But officials were cautious about making too much of it. Last year was compared to a time period that included a large salmonella outbreak tied to eggs.

Overall, there wasn't much change. The CDC report found no significant change in most kinds of . There was a spike in illnesses caused by a bacteria found in raw shellfish like oysters, but the number of cases was still relatively small.

More information: CDC report: www.cdc.gov/mmwr

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