Unplanned pregnancy remains high among young Australian women

April 2, 2014

Despite high rates of contraceptive use, unwanted pregnancies resulting in terminations remain high among young women.

In an article in the April issue of the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Danielle Mazza from Monash University, and colleagues, examine the paradox of high rates of contraceptive use, over the counter availability of emergency contraception and unplanned pregnancy.

"The emergency contraceptive pill has been available to women for over-the-counter purchase since 2004," Professor Mazza said.

"Together with high rates of contraceptive use, this should result in lower rates of for Australian women, but it has not.

"Although women have a high level of awareness of the emergency contraceptive pill, their knowledge about how and when to use it, and where to obtain it, remains inadequate.

"Further research is needed to better understand the role of GPs in helping women to understand their contraceptive options and reduce unplanned pregnancy."

Explore further: Attention to postpartum contraception needed

More information: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1753-6405

Related Stories

Attention to postpartum contraception needed

April 2, 2014

(HealthDay)—Women in the postpartum period should receive counseling and access to contraceptive methods to promote optimal birth spacing, according to research published in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics ...

Adjunct social media improves contraceptive knowledge

March 27, 2014

(HealthDay)—Use of social media in addition to standard contraceptive education is associated with improved patient contraceptive knowledge, according to research published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Recommended for you

Sleep can affect male fertility

October 19, 2016

(HealthDay)—Sleeping too little or too much can affect a man's ability to impregnate his partner, new research suggests.

Does it matter how long you sit—if you are fit?

October 19, 2016

More and more studies confirm that sitting is bad for our health, increasing the likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease and other lifestyle-related illnesses such as diabetes. Some studies have estimated that being ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.