$2.3M payment in New York surgery death case

May 12, 2014

A plastic surgeon who has appeared on television to talk about the procedures she offers has settled with the family of a New York woman who died following a liposuction procedure.

Legal documents filed last week say Dr. Sharon Giese will pay $2.3 million to the husband and young children of 32-year-old Nanuet resident Adriana Porras, who died in June 2009 two days after Giese operated on her.

The husband's lawsuit against Giese says Porras died from a stemming from a blood clot in her lung.

The settlement was reached in April.

Giese has appeared on shows including "Dr. Oz." She hasn't returned a call to her office seeking comment.

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