AMA proposing specialty care, payment models to CMS

AMA proposing specialty care, payment models to CMS

(HealthDay)—The American Medical Association (AMA) and other specialty societies have created new care delivery and payment models that they expect to be supported by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, according to a recent AMA news release.

The AMA has recommended detailed actions CMS should take in developing new specialty payment models, including allowing flexibility; offering risk protection for physicians; and providing timely, accurate data so physicians can benchmark their progress.

While CMS sought comments on the procedural episodes and complex chronic disease approaches, the AMA suggested that a model designed around uncomplicated chronic disease management could help prevent patients from developing more advanced disease and experiencing acute episodes. In addition, the AMA suggested another potential model for specialty-specific, risk-adjusted global payments. This would allow larger practices or multi-specialty groups to design comprehensive, specialty-specific or condition-specific global payments that would cover all services needed to treat a specific condition managed by that specialty.

"A relatively small number of different types of reforms can be developed that will be applicable to a broad range of specialties and the majority of patients within each specialty," the AMA said in its comments to CMS.

More information: More Information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

AMA provides resources to aid physicians' collections

Apr 06, 2014

(HealthDay)—The American Medical Association (AMA) has released resources to help doctors confront policy jumpers who may pose a financial risk to physicians during the Affordable Care Act's 90-day premium ...

American medical groups protesting physician cuts

Nov 25, 2013

(HealthDay)—Medical societies are taking action against the mass cancellations of physicians in Medicare Advantage plans in many states, according to an article published online Nov. 22 in Medical Economics.

Recommended for you

The hunt for botanicals

4 hours ago

Herbal medicine can be a double-edged sword and should be more rigorously investigated for both its beneficial and harmful effects, say researchers writing in a special supplement of Science.

Mozambique decriminalises abortion to stem maternal deaths

5 hours ago

Mozambique has passed a law permitting women to terminate unwanted pregnancies under specified conditions without risking punishment, a move hailed by activists in a country where clandestine abortions account for a large ...

Infertility, surrogacy in India

6 hours ago

Infertility is a growing problem worldwide. A World Health Organization report estimates that 60-to-80 million couples worldwide currently suffer from infertility.

Tooth loss linked to slowing mind and body

18 hours ago

The memory and walking speeds of adults who have lost all of their teeth decline more rapidly than in those who still have some of their own teeth, finds new UCL research.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.