First American MERS patient released from hospital

May 10, 2014

The first American diagnosed with a mysterious virus from the Middle East has been released from an Indiana hospital and is consider fully recovered, the hospital said Friday.

Community Hospital chief medical information officer Dr. Alan Kumar said the patient now tests negative for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, and "poses no threat to the community."

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the patient is an American man. He flew from Saudi Arabia to Chicago on April 24 and took a bus to Indiana. He sought treatment last Monday and was diagnosed with MERS.

MERS belongs to the coronavirus family that also includes the common cold and SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome.

It appears to be unusually lethal—by some estimates, it has killed nearly a third of the people it sickened. That's a far higher percentage than or other routine infections.

But it is not as contagious as flu, measles or other diseases. There is no vaccine or cure.

Friday's statement said no additional cases of MERS have been identified.

While the virus is not highly contagious, the hospital has isolated at home 50 employees identified as having come in contact with the man before he was diagnosed.

Explore further: Greece reports 1st MERS case, patient critical

Related Stories

First US MERS patient improving, officials say

May 4, 2014

(HealthDay)—A man hospitalized in Indiana with the first U.S. case of a deadly respiratory virus that initially surfaced in the Middle East two years ago is improving, state health officials reported Saturday.

First US MERS patient could leave hospital soon (Update)

May 5, 2014

Health officials said Monday they expect the first patient in the United States diagnosed with a mysterious virus from the Middle East to be released soon from a hospital, though he could continue to be isolated at home.

Recommended for you

Immune breakthrough: Unscratching poison ivy's rash

August 23, 2016

We all know that a brush with poison ivy leaves us with an itchy painful rash. Now, Monash University and Harvard researchers have discovered the molecular cause of this irritation. The finding brings us a step closer to ...

Zika infection may affect adult brain cells

August 18, 2016

Concerns over the Zika virus have focused on pregnant women due to mounting evidence that it causes brain abnormalities in developing fetuses. However, new research in mice from scientists at The Rockefeller University and ...

Monkeys with Sudan ebolavirus treated successfully

August 22, 2016

Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have successfully treated monkeys several days after the animals were infected with Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). The study is important, according to the researchers, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.