Automated CT dose-tracking software effectively monitors dosage in a clinical setting

Dose-tracking software provides effective and easy monitoring of radiation dose exposure in a busy academic practice, according to research conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital.

For commonly ordered abdominal CT exams, iterative reconstruction techniques enabled approximately 50 percent dose reduction compared to the national averages reported in the Dose Index Registry.

"A busy practice with diverse CT technology and remote scanner locations encounters challenges in assessing institutional performance in lowering ," said researcher Yasir Andrabi. "Software-based dose monitoring simplifies the complex and essential quality and safety assurance with CT scanning irrespective of the scanner location."

More information: Dr. Andrabi will present his study on May 5 at the 2014 ARRS Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Pepper and halt: Spicy chemical may inhibit gut tumors

11 hours ago

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that dietary capsaicin – the active ingredient in chili peppers – produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining ...

Expressive writing may help breast cancer survivors

13 hours ago

Writing down fears, emotions and the benefits of a cancer diagnosis may improve health outcomes for Asian-American breast cancer survivors, according to a study conducted by a researcher at the University of Houston (UH).

Taking the guesswork out of cancer therapy

19 hours ago

Researchers and doctors at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN), Singapore General Hospital (SGH) and National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) have co-developed the first molecular test ...

Brain tumour cells found circulating in blood

20 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—German scientists have discovered rogue brain tumour cells in patient blood samples, challenging the idea that this type of cancer doesn't generally spread beyond the brain.

International charge on new radiation treatment for cancer

20 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—Imagine a targeted radiation therapy for cancer that could pinpoint and blast away tumors more effectively than traditional methods, with fewer side effects and less damage to surrounding tissues and organs.

User comments