Computerized tool cuts risk of prolonged QTc interval

Computerized tool cuts risk of prolonged QT<sub>c</sub> interval

(HealthDay)—Use of a computerized clinical decision support system (CDSS) may reduce the risk of prolonged QTc interval in hospitalized patients at risk for torsades de pointes, according to research published online May 6 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

James E. Tisdale, Pharm.D., of Purdue University in Indianapolis, and colleagues assessed QTc interval prolongation in admitted to cardiac care units before (1,200 patients) and after (1,200 patients) implementation of the CDSS. QTc interval prolongation was defined as QTc interval >500 ms or increase in QTc of ≥60 ms from baseline.

The researchers found that implementation of the CDSS was independently associated with decreased risk of QTc interval prolongation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.65; 95 percent confidence interval [CI}, 0.56 to 0.89; P < 0.0001). Use of the CDSS was also associated with decreased prescribing of noncardiac medications known to cause torsades de pointes, including fluoroquinolones and intravenous haloperidol (aOR, 0.79; 95 percent CI, 0.63 to 0.91; P = 0.03).

"A computerized CDSS incorporating a validated risk score for QTc prolongation influences the prescribing of QT-prolonging drugs and reduces the risk of QTc interval prolongation in hospitalized patients with torsades de pointes risk factors," the authors write.

Lilly Endowment Inc. funded the study. One author disclosed financial ties to Eli Lilly and other pharmaceutical companies.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Abnormal EKG can predict death in stroke patients

Mar 20, 2009

People who suffer an ischemic stroke and also have an abnormality in the heart's electrical cycle are at a higher risk of death within 90 days than people who do not have abnormal electrical activity at the time of emergency ...

Interarm BP difference may up cardiac risk in diabetes

Apr 03, 2014

(HealthDay)—Interarm differences in systolic blood pressure (BP) in patients with diabetes may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, according to research published ...

Recommended for you

Generation of tanners see spike in deadly melanoma

10 hours ago

(AP)—Stop sunbathing and using indoor tanning beds, the acting U.S. surgeon general warned in a report released Tuesday that cites an alarming 200 percent jump in deadly melanoma cases since 1973.

Penn team makes cancer glow to improve surgical outcomes

11 hours ago

The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence.

Cancer: Tumors absorb sugar for mobility

23 hours ago

Cancer cells are gluttons. We have long known that they monopolize large amounts of sugar. More recently, it became clear that some tumor cells are also characterized by a series of features such as mobility or unlikeliness ...

User comments