Consumers losing doctors with new insurance plans

by Kelli Kennedy

Some consumers are suffering buyer's remorse after realizing they bought insurance plans under the new health law and are now finding their longtime doctors and hospital networks aren't accepting those plans.

Consumers are finding their access limited across plans of all price ranges.

The undercuts President Obama's 2009 pledge that: "If you like your doctor, you will be able to keep your doctor, period." Consumer frustration over losing doctors comes as the Obama administration is still celebrating a victory with more than 8 million enrollees in its first year.

Narrow networks are part of the economic trade-off for keeping premiums under control and preventing insurers from turning away those with pre-existing conditions.

2 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Insurers: Sizeable majority has paid Obamacare premiums

May 07, 2014

(HealthDay)—A significant majority of Americans who signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act have completed the final step of enrollment by paying their first month's premium, insurers ...

Health law concerns for cancer centers

Mar 19, 2014

Some of the nation's best cancer hospitals have been left out by insurers selling coverage under President Barack Obama's health care law.

Recommended for you

Patient-centered medical homes reduce costs

16 hours ago

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH), introduced in 2007, is a model of health care that emphasizes personal relationships, team delivery of care, coordination across specialties and care settings, quality ...

New mums still excessively sleepy after four months

18 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—New mums are being urged to be cautious about returning to work too quickly, after a QUT study found one in two were still excessively sleepy four months after giving birth.

It's time to address the health of men around the world

18 hours ago

All over the world, men die younger than women and do worse on a host of health indicators, yet policy makers rarely focus on this "men's health gap" or adopt programs aimed at addressing it, according to an international ...

User comments